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Cadence now realizing EDA 360 vision: Nimish Modi


The EDA 360 was an industry vision. It reflected a change in market requirements. It was application driven system design. From a Cadence perspective, the company has done system design enablement, according to Nimish Modi, senior VP, marketing and business development, Cadence Design Systems Inc.

In Apple’s case, the iOS is unique. Cadence feels that the heart of the design is the SoC. The electrical analysis is becoming very important. For instance, how do you optimize before tape-out? Hardware and software conversion presents a huge problem as well. The IP plays an important part. Cadence did IP-as-a-service. It now has an IP strategy.

Today, EDA is about possibility, not productivity. Cadence provides tools and content for semiconductor and systems companies. It is now realizing the EDA 360 vision.

On IP
According to Modi, each IP is immensely complex. Standards based or interface IP is not enough! Silicon-proven design is the need of the hour. Now, more and more IP blocks are said to be coming together.

FPGA-based prototyping
Cadence is offering the Palladium XP, and its primary use is for system verification. Software development is becoming a little bit difficult. People are providing software prototypes. The Palladium compile, turnaround and debug are very fast, best-in-class. All memory, clocking, partitioning, etc., is now automated.

The capacity of the Protium platform is 100 million gates. It will enable hardware and software developers. The use model for Protium is:
* Hardware folks use it for hardware regression.
* Software folks use it for early software development.

The main value proposition is the faster bring-up time. Also, the Palladium hybrid model helps customers overcome the boot problem. It is a hybrid of emulation and virtual prototyping. The dynamic power analysis is another issue. The Palladium hybrid model helps to do the testing.

Collaboration with ARM
ARM provides processor IPs. Cadence works closely with ARM. Cadence is also co-optimizing its tools to provide the best PPA. Physical libraries and tools get optimized. Cadence’s tools are optimized for ARM architecture. Cadence is also the first ones on the access to the V8 ARM models.

Categories: Semiconductors

Intel’s vision for the cloud!


Allyson Klein, director, Leadership Marketing, Data Center Group, Intel Corp.

Allyson Klein, director, Leadership Marketing, Data Center Group, Intel Corp.

According to Allyson Klein, director, Leadership Marketing, Data Center Group, Intel Corp., the compute continuum has arrived. The connected world is becoming larger and more diverse. There will approximately be over 1 billion new users by 2015.

We are witnessing a sea of new devices, limited only by our creativity. There are estimated to be more than 15 billion devices connected by 2015. All of these devices are creating a renaissance of compute experience, that is pervasive and simple computing. These will once again change the ways we work and live.

And, a new frontier of insight, simplifying our lives and making our world more efficient. So, what about the cloud? Cloud will be the performance engine of the compute continuum.

There has been an introduction of a new economic model for computing: ~ 600 Apple iPhones will need a new server; and so would ~120 iPads. And, this is only said to be the beginning!

The data center processor growth has been >2X in 10 years. Data center acceleration is estimated to be >2X in the next five years. Cloud’s contribution to data center growth will be significant. In 2010, cloud was contributing 10 percent. This should double to 20 percent in 2015.

Intel’s strategy for creating the cloud includes:
IT & service providers – define and prioritize IT requirements.
Products & technologies – take advantage of new capabilities in Intel platforms.
Intel Cloud Builders – utilize proven reference solutions to ease your deployments.

The Open Data Center Alliance is a catalyst for change, given that open and interoperable solutions are essential. In October 2010, the Alliance established the first user-driven organization for cloud requirements. There were 70 IT leaders joined by technical advisor Intel. Five technical working groups were formed.

In June 2011, the Open Data Center Alliance released the first user-driven requirements for the cloud. It now has 4X members representing  over $100 billion in annual IT spend. There have been new technical collaborations as well — four organizations and four initial solutions providers. The Alliance endorses immediate use to guide member planning and purchasing decisions.

Vision technology can add valuable capabilities to electronic products: Jeff Bier, EVA


Jeff Bier,  co-founder and president, Berkeley Design Technology Inc.

Jeff Bier, co-founder and president, Berkeley Design Technology Inc.

Following my post on the formation of the Embedded Vision Alliance (EVA), I managed to speak with Jeff Bier, president, Berkeley Design Technology (BDTI), who went on to speak more about the Alliance’s capabilities.

First, the mission and vision of the Alliance.  Bier said: “The mission of the Embedded Vision Alliance is to transform the electronics industry with products that–through vision technology–are more intelligent and aware of their environments, and create significant new markets for electronic equipment and components. The goal of the Alliance is to speed the adoption of computer vision capabilities in electronic products.

“The strategy of the Alliance is to inspire and empower engineers to incorporate vision capabilities into their products by providing practical information, insights, skills, and standards.”

I asked Jeff Bier whether the Alliance had restricted itself to markets such as automotive driver assistance, home surveillance, and gaming systems? “No,” he said! “We believe that vision technology can add valuable capabilities to electronic products in many markets – as well as enabling the creation of entirely new kinds of products. Automotive driver assistance, surveillance, and gaming systems are examples of vision applications where products already exist at consumer price points – and in some cases these products are already shipping in high volume.

“While we certainly believe that there will be more such products in these markets in the future, we also believe that there will be compelling vision-based products in other markets, ranging from smartphones to consumer electronics to medical devices to digital advertising.”

In that case,  what kind of applications can one expect getting covered in retail and entertainment, medical applications, especially. Bier replied, “The Embedded Vision Alliance doesn’t intend to try to pick winners among embedded vision applications – but rather, to enable as many players as possible.”  Here are some examples (including some existing products and some that are just ideas):

Retail: Digital signs that measure the success of an advertisement in attracting and retaining a viewer’s attention – and that select among a number of ads depending on the gender and age of the viewer. Vending machines that exclude minors from purchasing prohibited items, such as alcoholic beverages.

Entertainment: There are some awesome possibilities here, such as toys that recognize which child is playing with them and respond based on that child’s preferences. Video games that put the person inside the game, or inside the television program, for example.

Medical: Systems that watch hospital rooms and warn caregivers when they’ve forgotten to wash their hands, to cut down on infections. Machines that recognize medications and help elderly people take the right medication at the right time. Exercise equipment that detect a person’s heart rate and respiration rate without requiring electrodes.

Now, implementing embedded vision is going to pose a challenge! I asked Bier how the Alliance will overcome this. He replied: “We don’t expect to overcome it all by ourselves, but we hope to help, by providing design engineers get the kinds of practical information, insights, and skills required to implement embedded vision—and by providing a centralized place for such resources. This kind of information is difficult to come by today – by far the majority of computer vision information available today is theoretical, academic work.

“The first project of the Alliance is the web site, http://www.embedded-vision.com.  The web site will deliver a variety of information including technical articles, product information, discussion forums, and demonstrations. In the near future, we will begin to deliver additional resources, such as newsletter and online seminars.”

Finally, the Alliance needs to create opportunities for technology providers to reach out to embedded vision system designers in the coming months. “Definitely”, said Bier.  “The web site is already beginning to provide such opportunities, and we will continue to do so there as well as with other initiatives, such as educational seminars and on-line conferences.”

Embedded Vision Alliance (EVA) is born!


The Embedded Vision Alliance is born! Over 15 leading technology companies, including some really big names in semiconductors, have come together in Oakland, USA, to ‘ speed the adoption of computer vision capabilities in electronic products’.

BDTI, Xilinx, and IMS Research initiated the Embedded Vision Alliance (EVA) and are being joined by Analog Devices, Apical, Avnet Electronics Marketing, CEVA, CogniVue, Freescale, National Instruments, NVIDIA, Texas Instruments, Tokyo Electron Device, MathWorks, Ximea, and XMOS as founding members.

According to a release, the ability of machines to see and understand their environments—what we call “embedded vision”—promises to transform the electronics industry with products that are more intelligent and aware of their environments, and to create significant new markets for electronic equipment and components.

This new consortium, called the Embedded Vision Alliance, will enable the proliferation of embedded vision technology by providing design engineers with information, practical know-how, and industry standards.

Tim Erjavec, senior director, FPGA Platform Product Marketing, Xilinx, said: “It was clear to both BDTI and us that the adoption of an array of technologies in  intelligent video, video analytics, computer vision and other complementary technologies are making their way into many more application than ever before. In looking at integrating the right solution to a given problem in various applications, the lack of readily available information to get started or evaluate is apparent.

“Further, what is available is very diverse, in many cases very complex and not aggregated at any one place. So, in order to help system designers in designing-in “vision” into their applications, we saw the opportunity to aggregate many of the contributing technologies, products, companies and expertise into one place. Thus, the alliance and new website was formed and launched last week.”

While the participants in this Alliance need to be congratulated for their foresight, one wonders what took them so long!

Also, I do not see any Indian company in the list, although, the embedded systems and software industry here is quite large. Names, such as Ittiam, Tata Elxsi, etc., should be part of this Alliance, but they are absent, as of now!

Now, the EVA’s commitment is to vision technology and enabling customers to develop the industry’s most innovative hardware, development tools and software to make vision application development easier. One of the founders has commented that embedded vision will be used on automobiles to prevent accidents and to security cameras to prevent crimes. Should this happen, embedded vision will surely proliferate across a multitude of markets! We are all waiting really patiently for such days!

Belgian contingent graces ISA Vision Summit 2011

February 22, 2011 1 comment

The Belgium contingent was at full strength at the ISA Vision Summit 2011, with five key representatives. These included:
* AnSem
* imec
* NXP
* Target Compiler Technology
* Televic Group.

The twin objective of this delegation is to stimulate innovation by enabling and supporting co-operation with Indian partners. Another objective is to promote the DSP Valley network and the region of Flanders/Belgium as having a unique experience in the domains of wireless communications, DSP and embedded system design.

More later! ;)

Categories: Semiconductors

Driving global markets through local innovation: ISA Vision Summit 2011


This was perhaps the best session of the day, but held at the end! More later! ;)

Categories: Semiconductors

ISA Vision Summit 2011: Energy saved is energy produced!


As usual, there was a session on solar energy, that focused on how 1 unit of energy saved is energy produced!

More later! ;)

Categories: Semiconductors

Healthcare and education — next gen in multi-disciplinary system design: ISA Vision Summit 2011


According to Dr. Prem Kalra, director, IIT, Rajasthan, one should be able to solve problems on becoming educated. To make students job creators, you need to empower them!

More later! ;)

Categories: Semiconductors

Infosys presents three points for India’s growth: ISA Vision Summit 2011


One wonders what S.D. Shibulal, COO and member of the board, Infosys Technologies, was doing as the speaker for Market and business dynamics in emerging markets. Nevertheless, he was the speaker after the inauguration of the ISA Vision Summit 2011.

More later ;)

 

Categories: Semiconductors

ISA Vision Summit 2011: Nanotech likely to catch us all unaware!


Dr. Bobby Mitra speaking at the ISA Vision Summit 2011.

Dr. Bobby Mitra speaking at the ISA Vision Summit 2011.

“The electronics industry in India, touching $60 billion, has now thrown up a challenge,” said Dr. N. Seshagiri, former director-general, National Informatics Centre (NIC), chief guest at the 6th ISA Vision Summit, which kicked off today in Bangalore. “This decade can see many disruptions. One innovation likely to catch all of us unaware is nanotech!”

According to Dr. Seshagiri, nanotech devices have been valued at $1.6 trillion by 2013.  Electronics, especially nano-electronics is yet another opportunity to energize the Indian economy in this and the next decade.”

He added that India isn’t lagging behind as about 30 Indian companies had exported goods worth a few billion dollars. Nanotech isn’t far away, as there can’t be a better enabler than microtech and nanotech. The entry cost to nanotech is relatively low. One can find companies from China and India emerging.

What should India do with electronics hardware and IT? We don’t expect the Indian software industry to be interested in nanotech. We need to start learning new electronics from now on.

More and more R&D should now come to India and China. Our patent laws are neither bad nor good. There is now a need to work out a win-win situation. To make that happen, the Indian government’s patent policies need to change.

Dr. Seshagiri added: “We must build awareness among the Indian ESDM companies and also within the government. The ISA would do well to bring the Indian government into its shelter.”

Dr, Ajay Kumar, joint secretary, Department of IT, Government of India, said that the ISA Vison Summit 2011 focuses on a very relevant theme. While India is fairly well known in software, it lacks in electronics system and manufacturing. As per the task force in 2009, demand for electronic systems is projected to grow from $45 billion to $400 billion. At the current rate, approxiately $104 million can be  manufactured here and the rest has to be taken care of by imports. He added: “Electronic system design and manufacturing can propel the industry toward energy efficiency. The time has come to show India’s might.” Read more…

Categories: Semiconductors
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