Home > Atom, Blade.org, Calpella, Core i7 processor, IBM, IDF Taiwan, Intel, Kirk Skaugen, Nehalem, Piketown, SSI, storage > IDF Taiwan: Desktops with Intel Core i7; IBM, Intel ally on Blade servers

IDF Taiwan: Desktops with Intel Core i7; IBM, Intel ally on Blade servers

October 24, 2008

There’s more news from IDF, Taiwan, folks! One, Intel is all set to launch high-end desktops powered by the Intel Core i7 processor, next month. This was disclosed by Kirk B. Skaugen, Vice President, Digital Enterprise Group, General Manager, Server Platforms Group, in the Digital Enterprise Keynote: IA = Embedded + Dynamic, during the recently held Intel Developer Forum (IDF).

Intel vPro technology-based business clients: “Piketown” for desktops and “Calpella” for notebooks, will be powered by future Nehalem processors and will provide corporate customers with even more enterprise-focused innovations.

Also, Intel and IBM strengthened their Blade server segment partnership. More of that a bit later!

According to Skaugen, we are in the third stage of the Internet revolution. “The fourth stage is the pervasive Internet. By 2015, there will be 15 billion devices connected to the Internet. The Atom processor has unleashed a new wave of connected devices. However, these devices will need massive infrastructure support as well. Storage will also become a massive area of growth and development,” he added.

IBM Switch specs opened to SSI
According to Skaugen, the best infrastructure is built on infrastructure standards. Citing IDC figures, he said that the Blade market growth will be 37 percent CAGR during 2007-11. The Apac market will grow 78 percent.

IBM and Intel also strengthened their alliance in Blade servers. Mark Wiltse, IBM Systems & Technology Group, said that Blade.org has been created and is focused on solutions collaboration. “We are opening up the IBM Switch specifications to Server Systems Infrastructure (SSI). This will create broader opportunities in Blade. There is broad support for SSI Blade specifications.” IBM will extend the BladeCenter switch specification for blade servers to the SSI on a royalty-free basis.

Commenting on the Nehalem, Skaugen added that it is a next generation microarchitecture, using second generation of virtualization, and there is 3X memory bandwidth support as well. Intel’s Power Boost technology has also been used on the Nehalem.

Skaugen also provided details of next-generation high-end desktops powered by the Intel Core i7 processor, launching next month. These high-end desktops will provide outstanding performance for gaming and content creation applications.

Calpella and Piketown in the offing
He shared that the 2009 Intel vPro technology-based business clients codenamed “Piketown” for desktops and “Calpella” for notebooks will be powered by future Nehalem processors and will provide corporate customers with even more enterprise-focused innovations.

The upcoming Nehalem microarchitecture spans a range of products. First segments will include the Intel Core i7 processor and a variant designed for the efficient performance server segments codenamed “Nehalem-EP.”

A derivative designed for the expandable server market segment (“Nehalem-EX”) as well as other desktop and mobile versions (“Havendale,” “Lynnfield,” “Auburndale” and “Clarksfield”) will be in production beginning in the second half of 2009.

Nehalem’s integrated power gate
Stephen S. Pawlowski, Intel Senior Fellow, highlighted that the Nehalem has an integrated power gate. “We have got the M9 (metal 9) deposited on the silicon to create low-power resistance.” Having power gates means that the idle cores use near zero power.

Several Intel partners also showcased their products at IDF Taiwan. There were 37 new motherboards, while the Nehalem EP was touted as the world’s most adaptable server platform. Skaugen said: “it is energy efficient and designed for virtualization. Also, there is investment protection with FlexMigration.”

32/64GB SSDs on offer
Intel also introduced its range of SSDs, in 2.5-inch form factors, with 32/64GB storage at the IDF.

Citing SSD benefits, he said these included 6X performance increase, 46X power reduction and 75 percent space reduction.

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